Archive | September, 2012

My experience with RIFT: third time lucky

Here’s something that would have surprised me a year ago: I just got my first RIFT character to the level cap. (I know, I know, years behind dot com.)

Shimmersand by night

I tried RIFT with some friends for the first time last year, and at the time I was fairly unenthused by it. Sure, it was prettier than WoW, and the souls system was interesting, but really – as I described it to Kris – it was just like WoW except I was a lowbie with no money or resources. (And it was prettier.) Although RIFT clicked for a couple of my friends, as a group we drifted off to some other game — all the while playing and raiding in WoW as our primary game.

Then we tried RIFT again a few months later, and again, it just didn’t stick. I had more fun this time around, because we focused on the elements that made RIFT unique – to wit, we did a lot of rift-closing and invasion-chasing (and world-event-completing), and we spent almost no time questing. Still, RIFT didn’t offer me anything much that I couldn’t get elsewhere, and it occurred to me that I am so done with questing.

It’s not RIFT’s fault, of course — nor is it WoW’s, even. I’ve just seen how quests can be done better, and as a result my standards are higher. First SWTOR missions set the bar for emotional immersion (bear in mind that I’m also a pen-and-paper gamer in a roleplaying-heavy group; although I don’t RP in MMOs, story immersion is like catnip to me). Then TSW missions set the bar for intellectual immersion, being challenging, interesting and largely unique.

I Hope You Like SurprisesBy comparison, the “traditional” (ie WoW-style) questing in RIFT is almost entirely unappealing, and I’ve become one of those players who used to horrify me – I click to accept the quest without reading a scrap of quest text, and I only go back to read the quest in my log if I need more info to complete it. Ridiculously, I feel guilty about it, especially since I used to quietly judge other players for behaving like this. But now that I’ve seen questing done better, in two different ways, the old-school of questing holds almost no appeal for me. (Which is a shame, since then I miss the entertainment value of quests like “I Hope You Like Surprises”, the hilariously amusing quest in Shimmersand.)

This time around, though, I had a mission. I’d seen some preview videos of the upcoming Storm Legion expansion, and I fell in love with the player housing. Sadly I’m unlikely to ever find a player housing system like Star Wars Galaxies’, but a well-done housing system of any sort is a huge draw for me – I spent many, many hours in LotRO making my house and our kinship house look just right. Knowing housing was coming drew me back to RIFT, and I’ve been having enough fun that I plonked money down for the year long subscription with bonus free expansion. It seems player housing was the ‘killer app’ that I needed to turn RIFT from “fun enough” into something I actively look forward to playing.

So here I am in RIFT, level 50 and everything. Oddly, I’m actually looking forward to the process of gearing up, learning the RIFT endgame, and maybe even dabbling in raiding waters.

Sashire at 50

The trap of linearity

Tobold is experiencing Mists of Pandaria largely spoiler-free, and is concerned that MoP is shaping up to be just as linear as Cataclysm.

Blizzard is making most of their money from people like my wife, who was subscribed to WoW all the way through Cataclysm, and was busy leveling alts.

Mists of Pandaria might well turn out to be the worst expansion ever to level alts in. It has the linearity of Cataclysm zones, but where Catalysm had two possible zones to start in, Mists of Pandaria only has one. The Jade Forest might end up being more hated than Hellfire Peninsula, because in Hellfire at least you could skip the quests you didn’t like. All the talk you heard about Blizzard making MoP more casual-friendly is going to come to nothing if those casuals become bored of leveling alts due to linear questing.

An SWTOR mission

This is exactly the problem I encountered with SWTOR. The class quests are unique to your class, but the rest of the zones are incredibly linear, with very little room for deviation. The best you can do is try to get ahead on XP and skip side quests, but you can’t just ignore a zone planet completely even when you’re totally burnt out on it.

This pretty much killed any desire I had to play alts in a serious way in SWTOR, despite my interest in the different classes and their individual stories. It is, I think, probably the single biggest flaw with SWTOR: the replayability is very low1, which means that there’s little motivation to continue subscribing2 after you’ve played both factions to level cap. Even raiders need something to do outside of raid times.

Tangentially, The Secret World has the same problem — however, it’s less of an issue in TSW because you can do everything on one character (except experience the very small amount of faction-specific content), so a) there’s less impetus to play alts, and b) you’ve got a lot more to keep you busy on your main character anyway.

Totally linear quest progression is, I think, a design mistake for a traditional MMO. It may enable the devs to tell more interesting, engrossing and epic stories, but it’s at the expense of replayability, and replayability is where the MMO money is.

  1. Relative to most other MMOs.
  2. For most people.

How Cataclysm killed WoW for me

A crying paladin.So Mists of Pandaria went live last night, I gather? This is the first WoW expansion where I haven’t been even remotely interested. For every previous expansion I’d beta-tested, prepared exhaustively, pre-ordered, and blogged extensively about the whole experience. For MoP, I watched over Kris’s shoulder while he did ten minutes of questing in the beta, and that was enough to satisfy my curiosity.

It’s an odd feeling. I don’t miss WoW, but I miss missing WoW, if that makes sense. I played WoW to the exclusion of every other game for nearly six years, and for another year unenthusiastically. For those first six years, though, WoW captivated me; I had a lot of spare time on my hands for health reasons, and I poured much of it into WoW. And as a result, I felt I’d “mastered” WoW; I felt completely at home in the game. I wasn’t a hardcore raider because I preferred my more laid-back raiding guild, but I knew the mechanics of my class inside-out, I knew the lore behind the content, and I had all the advantages that six years of enthusiastic play will give. I had all the little convenience doodads to port hither and yon, I had all the obscure and useful crafting recipes, I’d maxed out almost every faction, and I knew all the shortcuts – the hidden questgivers, the fastest way to a given location, the best way to level to 40, whatever.

And then along comes Deathwing and everything changes. All of a sudden Azeroth isn’t familiar any more; I no longer know it like the back of my hand. Everything up to level 60 is different; content I knew and loved has just disappeared – replaced in some cases, gone forever in others. I don’t feel at home any more. It’s like coming back to the town where you grew up to find that the streets are all there but every building has been replaced. 1 There’s no sense of history in wandering around these zones any more; no nostalgia or fond memories, because everything I did has been wiped away.

But the game was still similar enough that I have no desire to spend another six years reacquainting myself with all the little ins and outs; it wasn’t new enough to make that fun again. I’ve levelled my squillion alts, and the game’s not fresh enough any more to warrant levelling another squillion.

And then you add the final factor: the homogenisation. To be fair, this was a trend that began in WotLK; tidying up the messy, asymmetric old content to make it all shiny and ‘balanced’ – but WotLK only applied the principle to its own content, whereas Cata went back and swept everything away with its shiny new broom. Everything’s neat and tidy and organised – and as a result it feels planned to within an inch of its life, orderly and symmetrical and completely inorganic and uninteresting. It might be more balanced, it might be smoother for a new player, but I prefer crunchy and interesting to smooth any day.

So I’ve come to the conclusion that I don’t think Mists of Pandaria is for me. I’m not interested in the direction in which Blizzard is taking the game, and Cataclysm swept away my nostalgia, familiarity and comfort. Really, Cataclysm made it easy for me to leave WoW, because it cut the cords holding me there. So I moved on, and I’m not sure I can ever go back again. I’m sure at some point in the next year I’ll succumb to a moment of weakness and pick up Mists of Pandaria for a while, when there’s nothing else to play and nostalgia is particularly strong, but I don’t think the Azeroth I miss exists now, and this new Azeroth isn’t home any more.

Whatever happens, I’ll still miss missing WoW, and I’ll be happy for the people who can still love WoW the way I used to.

  1. And the trees all look identical, and are made of plastic. Whoops, was that cynical?

What’s nifty about Firefall

I’ve been playing the Firefall closed beta with Kris lately, and enjoying it a surprising amount. It’s a F2P MMOFPS with an open world for PvE and battleground-style instanced PvP, set in a future Earth after a spaceship crash that’s rendered the vast majority of the Earth uninhabitable. At the moment the PvE content is noticeably lacking1, but it’s still heaps of fun tooling around blowing the heads off mutant bug monsters. And the game has the single best implementation of jumpjet-style movement I’ve ever played; just running around is gleeful fun.

Me, demonstrating jumpjets

When you start the game you choose a battleframe, which is basically lightweight power armor originally designed for a combat game in the setting’s backstory, now adapted for the war for survival in which humanity finds itself. Your five options are Assault (AoE DPS and mobility), Biotech (DPS limited healing ability), Engineer (DPS and support devices like turrets), Recon (sniper-range precision DPS) and Dreadnaught (survivability and massive single-target DPS). You’re not limited by your starting choice, though — you can buy different frames with in-game currency (although garage slots are limited and opening extra slots costs RL money).

And I’ll digress here for a moment to highlight my single biggest gripe about the game: yet again, there’s a ludicrous and sexist gender disparity in character gear. As an example: male characters in Assault armor get a tank top and cargo pants; female characters in Assault armor get a sports bra and hotpants. Sigh.

The Assault frame, male and female

(And don’t even get me started on the female dance animations. “Pole dancer” is not a good look for a combat veteran.)

Anyway, that non-minor quibble aside: one of the most interesting things about the game is character progression. Once you’ve got your battleframe, you can improve it by spending Experience to unlock new and upgraded equipment via the tech trees. The Tier 1 starting frame is relatively basic and gives a general taste of the frame’s abilities, but if you spend enough XP you can unlock Tier 2 frames – and Tier 3 and beyond are in development now. Generally the two Tier 2 frames focus on different aspects of the frame’s core playstyle – for instance, for Assault frames, the Tigerclaw frame provides superior mobility while the Firecat frame is focused on DPS.

The Assault battleframe progression

Within the tech tree for each frame, you can unlock specific ability modules and upgrades to your existing gear, which you can then fit to your battleframe in whatever configuration you prefer — subject to weight, power and CPU limitations. Most upgrades come in four flavours – the basic “Accord” variant, which is usually unlocked first, and then variants produced by three corporations: Astrek Association, Omnidyne-M and Kisuton. Each corp’s gear has certain specialties – for instance, compared with the standard Accord gear, Omnidyne-M armor plating gives extra health, Astrek armor plating gives health regeneration and Kisuton armor plating reduces incoming damage.

Tier 1 of the Assault battleframe's tech tree

Tier 2 of the Assault battleframe's tech tree

What really piqued my interest, though, was the sudden expansion of the crafting system as soon as I unlocked my Tier 2 frame. Any Tier II upgrades you unlock (except the basic Accord versions) give you the piece of gear to equip on your frame, and they also give you a crafting recipe.

Everyone gets access to crafting, via stations called Molecular Printers, and there are no skill levels involved. They’re introduced early in the PvE game via an introductory mission, and everyone starts with a selection of crafting recipes (or “nanoprints”) for basic items, consumables, and industrial processes like ore refining.

Tier 2 nanoprints allow you to make a crafted version of the basic upgrade you unlocked with XP, with superior stats (but commensurately higher mass, CPU and power requirements). They also introduce interesting complexity to the crafting system, because they introduce the concept of resource quality affecting the finished product.

Resources are in the form of minerals and are acquired by looting them from mobs, blowing up mineral nodes with sonic detonators, or using a temporary mining device called a Thumper. Thumping is a popular PvE activity because it causes waves and waves of mobs to spawn, providing handy home-delivered sources of XP and loot, so it’s fairly easy to rack up thousands of minerals without even trying. Acquiring good-quality materials takes a little more savvy, however.

Resource attributes

As you can see on the left, each resource possesses a number of attributes with numerical ratings: Conductivity, Density, Malleability, Reactivity and Resistance. These attributes are measured on a scale of 1-1000, and if you want to improve a particular attribute you can actually blend two resources — as you can see on the right — to change their attributes.

A Tier 2 nanoprintSo you take a look at a Tier 2 nanoprint, and you can see that the attributes of the resource used to craft it will affect the product’s attributes. This example is the nanoprint for the Kisuton variant of the Assault’s Tier 2 Crater ability (which lifts you up in the air and then blasts you back to the ground at high speed, conveniently AoEing all the mobs you land on). You can see that Reactivity is the most important attribute to improve the Crater module’s damage and radius, whereas Conductivity is the key attribute to reduce the ability’s cooldown. So to make this, I’d look for a resource high in Conductivity and Reactivity.

This will feel very familiar to former Star Wars Galaxies players, where these mechanics were the linchpin of the crafting system. But wait, it’s about to feel even more familiar: resources in Firefall change quality over time.

The overall quality of a resource is referred to by an isotope number next to the resource’s name – the higher the number, the better the resource. These resources shift over time; although each resource has upper and lower limits on each attribute — Bismuth is always going to have high Conductivity and Malleability — the Bismuth you find this week may well have very different stats from the Bismuth you found last week.

This introduces an interesting and complex crafting minigame, where you can spend hours working out the best materials to blend for the attributes you want. And again, former SWG players will remember the buzz of realising this week’s spawn of a given resource has fabulous stats and promptly spending the next week hoovering up as much as you possibly can.

In fact, the only fly in the ointment is that there’s currently no trading system or player economy in Firefall. Devs have said that trading is on the way, but not the highest priority; no word at this stage on any kind of player vendor/auction house system. So for now, anything you make is for you and you alone; you can’t trade or sell your wares (or even your raw resources) to anybody else. Once the trading system comes in however, if crafted items aren’t automatically bound to the crafter, there’s significant potential for Firefall to be almost as appealing to crafting lovers as SWG was.

  1. But the devs have said that they’re focusing on PvE content next.

When copying is a good thing

It’s no secret that plenty of games in the MMO space borrow from each other, and from their community. Each new game is, in many ways, a response to the games that have come before — and, of course, many of us bemoan that fact, or deride new MMOs as WoW Clones, and so on.

And yet it’s not at all uncommon to play a new game, stumble across a feature, and think “oh, ffs, [Game X] did that so much better; this is so clunky!” Or, more often, stumble across the lack of a feature, and be frustrated that “bah, [Game X] managed to get this right three years ago, why isn’t everyone doing it?“.

It’s terribly unfair of us, of course, to criticise games on the one hand for being too similar, and yet to complain on the other when New Game Y is missing the convenience features we’re used to in Old Game X. But apparently it’s human nature, so here are a few off the top of my head:

  • Looting: DCUO gave us one-key AOE looting. RIFT, WoW and SWTOR now have AoE loot; TSW and GW2 have keybound loot. Other MMOs are still catching up, but few games have matched DCUO’s looting convenience. Every time I kill a mob in SWTOR or RIFT I lament again the lack of a loot key – TSW and GW2 have spoilt me.
  • Selling junk: RIFT has a “sell vendor junk” button on every vendor window. Why doesn’t every game do this? (In fact, why even have vendor junk?) GW2 followed suit. SWTOR comes close with your ability to send off a companion to sell your junk for you. WoW solved the problem with addons. Other games missed the boat.
  • Character customisation in game: SWG had a brilliant “image designer” system back in 2004, people. LotRO caught up with the release of Barbers in Book 12, early 2008. WoW matched them with barbershops in Wrath of the Lich King, late 2008. RIFT only brought in stylists a month or so ago, and SWTOR still doesn’t have them. TSW launched without it, but is implementing them shortly; GW2 lacks any kind of in-game character customisation and ArenaNet’s said nothing about it.
  • Crafting: It’s no secret that I have strong opinions about how games implement crafting systems, but however else you feel about it, SWTOR did one thing brilliantly right: crafting from the bank. RIFT wasn’t far behind in implementing that, and players everywhere loved it, yet GW2 launched without it (as did TSW, though that was probably an inevitable effect of its crafting system).
  • Group-finding tools: I’m not sure whether WoW was the first to implement such a feature, but despite criticism it revolutionised gameplay for many many players. There are those who don’t like group finders, but they make it much easier to find groups for the majority of players, and especially in games with low (or spread-out) populations, one could argue that they’re vital. And yet they don’t seem to be a priority for many games at launch, oddly, despite grouping woes being one of the single biggest turn-offs for player retention.
  • Customisable UIs: WoW obviously set the bar here with its addon system (although it wasn’t the first by a long shot), and other games followed suit. Even games without addons allowed players to move and resize stock UI elements for their own comfort. Some devs, on the other hand, seem to be very precious about their beloved UIs, refusing to allow players to customise their layout in any meaningful way (which is a bad move on accessibility grounds, if nothing else). BioWare, thankfully, wised up with SWTOR and implemented a system like LOTRO and RIFT; ArenaNet, on the other hand, are very resistant to letting players customise GW2’s (intrusive and unfriendly) interface. It’s certainly not winning them any friends in my neck of the woods, I can tell you.

I’ve probably got a whole bunch of these wrong, in terms of who first pioneered an innovation, but the key point is not “who did it first” but “why isn’t everybody doing it now?”. I understand that devs want to set their game apart, but eschewing features that make gameplay better, more convenient or more satisfying is really not the way to do that.

So, what have I missed? I’m sure there are plenty of other features that should be industry-standard by now — and aren’t.

MMO communities aren’t a monoculture

I went for a low-sec roam with a bunch of my guildies in EVE tonight — we’re all in different corps because we prefer different playstyles in EVE, so we don’t get to play together very often, so it was a lot of fun. (And a lot less fatal than I was expecting!)

The Retribution I flew

Not that that’s what I set out to talk about; it just reminded me of an incident that happened last week. Kris cancelled a few of his EVE accounts, and we were discussing how much stuff he’d need to transfer out of their item hangars before the accounts shut down. And during the discussion, I discovered something about EVE I’d never have expected:

If you’re in a corporation, your corp’s directors can see what you have in your personal item hangar, in the station where your corp HQ is located.

I was stunned, because I can’t imagine a situation like that in any other MMO. Can you imagine the outcry from the community if, say, a WoW guild’s officers could see into the banks of any of their guildies who were sitting in Stormwind? It’s something that just would never happen, no matter how collectivist a guild was; I’m pretty sure that almost everybody would see it as an unreasonable invasion of privacy, and in no way something a guild should expect from its members.

And yet it seems perfectly normal in EVE; it’s just a given part of the game. More than anything, that’s a lesson that I probably needed — we bloggers talk all the time about “MMO players” and what they expect, how the culture operates, and how they behave. It’s worth remembering that different games do have different cultures that aren’t interchangeable, and expectations and assumptions that might be true in one game don’t necessarily apply to others across the board.

Five nonexistent MMOs I’d love to play

In honour of the Friday Five 1, and bearing in mind my opinions about what makes a good MMO setting, here are Five Non-Existent MMOs I’d Love to Play:

  1. An Exalted MMO, based on White Wolf’s tabletop RPG Exalted. This is a non-European post-apocalyptic high fantasy game, based on ancient Asian and Roman civilisations, with strange magitech, terrifying Primordials who want to destroy or enslave Creation, complicated politics, and awesome cinematic wuxia-style action. There’s a whole range of potential threats, with a powerscale that would nicely suit a levelling curve with bonus epic (very epic) endgame.
  2. An Earthdawn MMO, based on the obscure tabletop RPG Earthdawn, originally published by FASA as a prequel to Shadowrun. Set ten thousand years ago in an age of magic, Earthdawn is best described as post-apocalyptic fantasy horror — the world is just recovering from the Scourge, a time of darkness when (evil, twisted) spirits called Horrors invaded and the people of the world hid from them in supposedly-impregnable caers. Horrors would make great enemies on every power level, from evil little skittering minions up to terrifying abominations the human mind was not meant to know, and the world would be perfect for exploration as the races of Earth are just starting to emerge from their caers and take stock of the wreckage.
  3. A Marvel superheroes MMORPG. DCUO was a letdown for a number of reasons, and its arguable failure (and the upcoming closure of CoH) doesn’t make superhero MMORPGs look like a good bet. Disappointing, as I’d always hoped to see a Marvel MMO — I simply prefer Marvel’s setting and universe, and I’ve been thoroughly turned off DC thanks to various shenanigans with their latest universe reboot. I know there’s an upcoming MMO, Marvel Heroes, but a) it’s an action RPG (ie Diablo-style gameplay), and b) you’re limited to playing a canonical character and just customising them, not playing one of your own. I want a “proper” (ie traditional) MMORPG, just set in the Marvel universe. (Although I am tickled by the fact that Squirrel Girl is one of the two dozen playable heroes.)
  4. A Harry Potter MMORPG. One of the things I enjoyed most about the Harry Potter series (and the reason it immediately exploded into such an active, insatiable fandom even among adults) was the wonder and possibility in the world. For everything that was defined in the books, ten more possibilities were hinted at, and there’s so much potential for excitement and adventure within the setting. (Also, Quidditch!)
  5. An Eclipse Phase MMORPG. Eclipse Phase, published by Posthuman Studios, is a tabletop roleplaying game of transhuman conspiracy and horror. It’s set in the future after wars have devastated Earth and (trans)humanity has fled to the stars. One of the most appealing things about the setting is that the technology exists to download one’s consciousness into everything from cloned bodies to battle robots to augmented animals, which suggests a lot of really fascinating gameplay options. The setting itself is also really cool, with a huge range of cultures and civilisations to explore. The game’s been a critical and commercial hit, and I think it’d translate very well to an MMORPG setting — in particular, the cloning and consciousness-transfer mechanics allow you to get around limitations like ‘dying regularly’, which is an obstacle MMO settings always have to justify.

Eclipse Phase, art by Stephan Martiniere

So, that’s my list — how about you? Any other super-awesome-cool MMOs that don’t exist but should?

(P.S. Plug time: Eclipse Phase is an amazing game, and if you have any interest in tabletop RPGs you should totally check it out. It’s licensed under Creative Commons, so you can download legitimate copies of the game and its supplements to try it out, and buy it if you love it. It’s totally awesome.)

  1. A long-standing blogging tradition that doesn’t seem to have migrated to the MMO blogosphere

The problem of (no) progression

I think GW2 has a serious flaw, and it’s one that I haven’t actually seen commentators discuss much. To wit: there’s not enough progression to keep one feeling satisfied during the levelling process.

The Swamp

It’s pretty well accepted that a feeling of progression is one of the strongest motivators for an MMO player; that satisfying “ding!” as you level up, gain a new ability point, or otherwise improve yourself. Many, many MMO players focus on the levelling experience and lose interest when they hit the level cap – or they roll another alt to do it all again.

When you start playing GW2 those dings come thick and fast. Every half-dozen kills you’re unlocking a new weapon ability, and there are plenty to unlock, from 28 unlockable weapon skills for the mesmer or thief right up to 64 for the elementalist. 1

Of course, that feeling of progression starts to slow down when you’ve unlocked all your weapon skills — but by then you’re well into unlocking slot skills, which open up at levels 5, 10 and 20 for your regular slot skills and level 30 for your elite skill.

By level 30, though, the future’s looking a bit less exciting. You’ve doubtless unlocked all your weapons by now. All your slot skills hotkeys are unlocked, and you’ve probably maxed out two of your five trait areas by now. And now there’s no more progression. No more cool abilities to come. Nothing new about your class – er, sorry, profession. You’ve seen it all; the gameplay you’re experiencing now is going to be the same for the next fifty levels. Call me hard to please, but level 30 seems a bit early to cap out on class mechanics.

Of course, there are still things left to do. There are more trait trees to spend points in. There are more skill points to earn, which you can spend on buying new slot skills. However, it’s my argument that these are fundamentally not very satisfying.

  • Traits are entirely passive modifications to existing abilities, so they do make you more powerful, but they don’t really affect how you play your character.
  • Buying new slot skills is diversification — horizontal progression. Any new slot skill you buy won’t be more powerful than what you already have, and it won’t be an addition to what you can do — it will, at best, be a replacement for one of your existing slot skills, which you might care to use in a different situation. (Provided you have the foresight to swap it in before you get into a fight, of course, otherwise it does you no good at all.)

To be fair, again, that last point isn’t strictly true; each class gets a Tier 2 elite skill which is probably more awesome than the Tier 1 elite skills. It’d want to be, as it costs 30 skill points and requires unlocking two Tier 1 elite skills at 10 points each. Either way, though, it’s just one last ding somewhere in between level 30 and level 80 (depending on how long it takes you to accrue the necessary skill points), and it’s still just a replacement for one of your Tier 1 elite skills — an alternative, not an addition.

The Swamp

And this lack of progression is compounded by the GW2 downlevelling mechanic, where one is always scaled downwards to meet the intended level of an area. Given the importance of dynamic events in GW2’s PvE world design, it’s certainly essential to stop high level players steamrolling lowbie events and making them meaningless for every other participant — however, there are other ways to do that 2 without making the player feel their progression is pointless. As Ashen said in the comments of a recent post at Blessing of Kings, “What’s the point of leveling up and me getting stronger if the game arbitrarily decides to throw that out of the window all the time?” 3

Levelling up still makes you objectively more powerful — new trait points give you passive boosts, and your attributes increase with every level. But subjectively, I don’t feel any more awesome now than I did five levels ago — I still have exactly the same experience fighting a level 25 mob at 30 as I did at 25. That, in my opinion, is a broken system.

Perhaps I’m missing something. Perhaps there’s progression lurking around the corner and it’s just in one of the game systems I haven’t encountered yet. I certainly hope so, because otherwise it’s pretty disappointing to think that, at level 30, I’ve already experienced everything my class has to offer.

  1. 30 for necromancers, 32 for rangers and guardians, and 40 for warriors, if you’re curious. The engineer is an anomaly at a mere 14, so let’s not talk about them because they spoil my argument.
  2. Such as giving higher level players the option to downlevel in lower level zones; if they choose not to downlevel, all mobs are green, they can’t do events, they can’t interact with resource nodes, et cetera. Kris came up with this one over dinner while we were discussing this issue, and it’s just one possible answer to the problem.
  3. This is, for instance, the same reason Blizzard had to make vehicles scale with player gear in raid encounters like Flame Leviathan – otherwise there’s no sensation of progression because the content never gets any easier.

Recommended: Good With Beer, the GW2 Chef Helper

In haste — I have a longer post brewing, with some thinky thoughts — I wanted to recommend a very handy tool:

Good With Beer is a GW2 Chef Helper tool provided by the lovely Arolaide of Dragonsworn, and it’s worth its weight in gold. Do webpages weigh anything? Never mind, it’s still awesome. Fast and easy checking of ingredients and recipes, and very useful for us completionists.